Month: October 2016

George Muller: Happy in the Lord

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You have put more joy in my heart than they have when their grain and wine abound. Psalm 4:7

I have found the following words by George Muller to be very helpful to me over the years. May they encourage you to get your soul happy in the Lord! And don’t let his looks and awesome fauxhawk fool you.

It has pleased the Lord to teach me a truth, the benefit of which I have not lost for fourteen years. The point is this: I saw more clearly than ever that the first great primary business to which I ought to attend every day was to have my soul happy in the Lord. The first thing to be concerned about was not how much I might serve the Lord, or how I might glorify the lord; but how I might get my soul into a happy state, and how my inner man might be nourished…

 Before this time my practice had been, at least for ten years previously, as a habitual thing, to give myself to prayer after having dressed myself in the morning. Now, I saw that the most important thing I had to do was to give myself to the reading of the Word of God, and to meditation on it, that thus my heart might be comforted, encouraged, warned, reproved, instructed…

 The first thing I did, after having asked in a few words the Lord’s blessing upon His precious Word, was to begin to meditate on the Word of God, searching as it were into every verse to get blessing out of it; not for the sake of public ministry of the Word, not for the sake of preaching on what I had meditated upon, but for the sake of obtaining food for my soul. The result I have found to be almost invariably this, that after a very few minutes my soul has been led to confession, or to thanksgiving, or to supplication; so that, though I did not, as it were, give myself to prayer, but to meditation, yet it turned almost immediately more or less into prayer. When thus I have been for a while making confession or intercession or supplication, or have given thanks, I go on to the next words or verse, turning all, as I go, into prayer for myself or others, as the Word may lead to it…

 By breakfast time, with rare exceptions, I am in a peaceful if not happy state of heart.

Crippled

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Thus says the LORD: “Heaven is my throne, and the earth is my footstool; what is the house that you would build for me, and what is the place of my rest? All these things my hand has made, and so all these things came to be, declares the LORD. But this is the one to whom I will look: he who is humble and contrite in spirit and trembles at my word. Isaiah 66:1-2

I recently wrapped up a study in Isaiah that refreshed my soul. In particular, the verses above in the last chapter of Isaiah have brought me much comfort. What’s so startling about this passage is the contrast between who God is in all of His power and yet He is concerned with the broken. Heaven is God’s throne and the earth is His footstool, so could we ever build a house that would be fitting? Of course not. But even if we could, God is not interested in living in tents, houses, or temples. God is not interested in houses, rather, He’s interested in hearts- our hearts.

Isaiah is telling us that this all-powerful King doesn’t look to the mighty. He doesn’t look to the powerful. He doesn’t look to the wise. He looks to the humble, the broken. In fact, the phrase “contrite in spirit” is literally “crippled” (nekeh) in the Hebrew language. It’s the same word that is used to describe Mephibosheth, Jonathan’s crippled boy (2 Samuel 4:4; 9:3). This word comes from the root word, nakah, which means, “to strike” and it often occurs in the context of fighting and war. So if a person is “crippled in spirit” it means that they have been wounded, and they need help, and they cannot make it on their own.

So what Isaiah is doing is giving us a picture of how merciful and gracious Jesus is toward sinners. He looks to the humble, the one crippled in spirit, the one who cannot make it on their own, the one who trembles at His word. That means that if you have been beat up by life, if you’re broken, if you’re falling apart at the seams, Jesus sees you. He sees and knows your pain. He comes to you. He comes to heal, to carry, to strengthen.

What good news for those beat up by the storms of life! Jesus sees and knows and cares. Humble yourself today. Tremble at His word. And take comfort that Jesus sees everything and He’s working through it all to bring you good.

Benji